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Courchevel 1650 resort guide

The quieter resort of Courchevel Moriond (1650) offers some of the best skiing in the whole of the Trois Vallées. It is fast establishing itself as a resort in its own right, with a much more mountain village feel.

Just a little further down the mountain from its glitzy big sister Courchevel 1850, the quieter resort of Courchevel Moriond (1650) offers some of the best skiing in the whole of the Trois Vallées. It is fast establishing itself as a resort in its own right, with a much more mountain village feel. It boasts some excellent hotels and facilities to guarantee a great skiing vacation, quite often at better value than Courchevel 1850. The village is a good family ski destination, as it suits all levels, and Scott Dunn can provide childcare for the younger ones. The village lines the main road up to 1850 but despite that, the main center is atmospheric with a quiet square surrounded by traditional Alpine buildings, bars and restaurants. Moriond boasts a good choice of shops, supermarkets and places to eat and drink to suit all tastes and has some lively après-ski. The main lift (the Bel Air) whisks you straight to the door of one of the most renowned mountain restaurants of the same name with one of the best terraces in the Trois Vallées. The “front de neige” is the perfect place to soak up the sun on one of the hotel terraces and watch the skiers coming down. Once the slopes are closed, this becomes a hive of activity for sledging. And for families or groups with non-skiers, Courchevel 1650 offers plenty of activity, with lots of good walks through the forests.

Resort facts and figures

Resort altitude: 1650m
Highest point: 2738m
Vertical drop: 1438m
Ski areas: Part of Les Trois Vallées, the largest ski areas in the world. Includes 6 other resorts: Méribel, La Tania, Les Menuires, Saint Martin de Belleville, Val Thorens and Orelle.
Lifts: 180
Pistes:
150km (600km for the Trois Vallées of which 52% beginner/intermediate, 38% advanced, 10% expert)
Best for: All levels of skier. Easy runs close to the village, steeper runs and plenty of off-piste terrain further up the mountain and a wealth of blue and red runs make the Courchevel area great for all levels.

Skiing in Courchevel 1650

With a lift system linking the village to Méribel and Val Thorens, Courchevel 1650 is located in the eastern end of the Trois Vallées and has sunny and forgiving skiing on the doorstep for beginner and intermediate skiers and access to the most exciting and extensive ski area in the world for good skiers. The slopes are wide and benefit from plenty of sun and tend to be less busy than those higher up, with fewer queues for the lifts. Being 200m lower than 1850, the quiet, tree-lined runs offer a very attractive proposition. On the very edge of the ski area is the Chapelets run, one of our favorites. For stronger skiers, access to the off-piste of the Chanrossa bowl is as easy from 1650 as from 1850. From here the Marmottes chairlift gives you direct access to Méribel and Courchevel 1850.

Meeting up with ski school couldn’t be easier. We use the English speaking New Generation who meet underneath the Ariondaz telecabine near the St Agathe drag lift. They have many years of experience in Courchevel 1650 and teach beginners on the gentle slopes of Granges and Marquis, and can take more advanced skiers to the fabulous off-piste runs in Les Avals. Alternatively, hire a guide to show you this great little itinerary.

Courchevel Moriond 1650

The village has a lively atmosphere and a busy center with good shops and excellent bars restaurants. The supermarket is not a disappointment and you’ll find it easy to stock up, even with fresh seafood! Also, try the deli next to Le Sherpas. Restaurants to try are Le Petit Savoyard, Montagne and L’Eterlou. And if you’re after a quick snack, Crêperie Titine Et Lilou is a good option.

The largest outdoor terrace in Courchevel can be found at Le Portetta. Right at the bottom of the main piste, it has large log burning fires, flaming torches, fur throws and heated bar seating – the ultimate indulgence after a day on the slopes. Try one of their pizzas from the wood burning oven, or relax in the Fire and Ice Bar after a long lunch. And for some lively après-ski, head for Le Bubble or La Boulotte. The Supper Club at La Boulotte also serves great food.

Courchevel Moriond 1650 insider tips

Find time to ski down the Indiens run where you’ll come across some interesting characters.

A highly recommended lunch stop is Le Bel Air Mountain Restaurant. It’s essential to reserve as it’s hugely popular, and you’ll soon see why. The food and service are excellent; it’s ski in / ski out, and can be reached on foot, making it perfect for non-skiers too.

La Casserole is a good value lunch stop, and when the sun is shining, its south facing terrace couldn’t be a nicer place to sit.

Each night at 7pm there is night skiing above the village on a floodlit slope. If you haven’t already overdone it on the après-ski!

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